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  • Writer's pictureStaff Report

Alabama Ranked #49 out of Fifty States for Healthcare, is Alabama Blue Cross to Blame?

Forbes Magazine recently ranked the fifty states according to criteria related to healthcare and Alabama came in shamefully as second to worst, only rising above neighboring Georgia to avoid the total disgrace of being worst in the nation. Hardly anything to brag about, Alabama coming in as second worst begs the question of who exactly is responsible for this shambolic mess? Judging by who has been tipping the scales in Montgomery and managing to be on the wrong side of every critical issue in the state for as long as anyone can remember, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Alabama has spent untold millions of dollars paying off legislators to advance their profit over people agenda. According to the infamously legendary rules of Pottery Barn; YOU BREAK IT, YOU BUY IT.


This one is on you, big crooks and bull shooters! BC really puts the BS in Alabama healthcare.







Many Americans feel dissatisfied with the U.S. healthcare system. In fact, more than 70% of adults say the healthcare system is failing to meet their needs in at least one way, according to a recent Harris Poll survey.
In the worst states for healthcare, accessing healthcare may be more challenging due to high costs, a lack of health insurance coverage, too few healthcare providers and barriers to receiving timely and effective care.
To determine which states are best and worst for healthcare, Forbes Advisor compared all 50 states across 24 metrics spanning four key categories: healthcare access, healthcare outcomes, healthcare cost and quality of hospital care.


Key Takeaways
Georgia tops the list of worst states for healthcare, while Minnesota is the state with the best healthcare.
Seven of the top 10 worst states for healthcare are in the South, including Georgia, Alabama, North Carolina, Mississippi, South Carolina, Arkansas and Texas.
Seven of the top 10 best states for healthcare are in the northeast, including Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine and Pennsylvania.
North Carolina is the worst state for healthcare costs, Utah is the worst state for healthcare access, New Mexico has the worst quality of hospital care and Mississippi is the worst state for healthcare outcomes.


Top 5 Worst States for Healthcare
1. Georgia
Georgia’s score: 100 out of 100
The Peach State ranked third worst in our category examining healthcare cost due, in part, to the state having the second highest percentage of residents who chose not to see a doctor at some point in the past 12 months due to cost (15.50%).
Georgia also stands out as the state with the:
Third highest percentage of residents who lack health insurance coverage (12.63%).
Fifth highest kidney disease mortality rate (18.87 deaths per 100,000 state residents).
Eighth highest stroke mortality rate (44.27 deaths per 100,000 state residents).
Eighth highest average deductible for residents with single health insurance coverage through an employer ($2,269 annually).


2. Alabama
Alabama’s score: 87.03 out of 100
Alabama employers cover the lowest percentage of employees’ annual health insurance premiums on average (73.42% for employees with single coverage).
Alabama also ranked fourth worst in our category assessing healthcare outcomes.
Alabama stands out as the state with the:
Second highest rate of both stroke deaths (53.63 per 100,000 state residents) and influenza and pneumonia deaths (17.03 per 100,000 state residents).
Fourth highest infant mortality rate (7.42 deaths per 1,000 live births).
Seventh highest chronic lower respiratory disease mortality rate (53.13 deaths per 100,000 state residents).
Additionally, The Yellowhammer State has the third lowest number of physician assistants (1.36 per 10,000 state residents) and the eighth lowest number of primary care physicians (12.22 per 10,000 state residents).


3. North Carolina
North Carolina’s score: 85.95 out of 100
North Carolina tops the list of worst states for healthcare costs.
North Carolinians with single health insurance coverage through an employer pay the eighth highest premium nationwide ($1,847 annually).
North Carolina employers cover the eighth lowest percentage of employees’ annual health insurance premiums on average (76.18% for employees with single coverage).
North Carolina also stands out as the state with the:
Fifth lowest number of nurse practitioners (4.28 per 10,000 state residents).
Eighth highest infant mortality rate (6.76 deaths per 1,000 live births).
Ninth highest rate of both stroke deaths (44.13 per 100,000 state residents), and influenza and pneumonia deaths (13.40 per 100,000 state residents).


4. Mississippi
Mississippi’s score: 84.70 out of 100
Mississippi tops the list of states with the worst healthcare outcomes.
The Magnolia State ranked worst in the nation for several outcome-related metrics, including:
Infant mortality rate (8.74 deaths per 1,000 live births).
Stroke mortality rate (54.80 deaths per 100,000 state residents).
Influenza and pneumonia mortality rate (22.57 deaths per 100,000 state residents).
Kidney disease mortality rate (21.80 deaths per 100,000 state residents).
Mississippi also ranked second worst for diabetes mortality rate (38.53 deaths per 100,000 state residents) and fifth worst for chronic lower respiratory disease mortality rate (58.40 deaths per 100,000 state residents).
Additionally, Mississippi stands out as the state with the:
Lowest number of physician assistants (0.40 per 10,00 state residents).
Second lowest number of critical care physicians (0.29 per 10,000 adults, tied with Arkansas).
Third highest percentage of hospital patients who did not receive written information about possible symptoms to look out for after discharge (15%).
Fifth highest percentage of residents who chose not to see a doctor in the past 12 months due to cost (13.10%).


5. South Carolina
South Carolina’s score: 83.50 out of 100
With the second lowest number of nurse practitioners (3.48 per 10,000 state residents) and the fifth lowest number of physician assistants (1.61 per 10,000 state residents), South Carolina ranks fifth among the worst states for healthcare.
The Palmetto State tied with Utah as the seventh worst state for healthcare costs due, in part, to the state having the seventh highest percentage of residents who chose not to see a doctor at some point in the past 12 months due to cost (11.70%, tied with Arkansas).
Additionally, South Carolina stands out as the state with the fifth highest infant mortality rate (6.93 deaths per 1,000 live births) and the seventh highest stroke mortality rate (44.67 deaths per 100,000 state residents).



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